Poultry Feed Formulation: Milled Poultry Feed

Scientifically Proven Ways How to Make Broiler Mash: Starter Mash, Grower Mash and Finisher Mash (Updated Nov. 2021)

In the article, we will briefly look at the ingredients and the formula guiding the formulation of the broiler starter mash, grower mash, finisher mash, and the post-finisher mash:-

How to Make Broiler Starter Mash

The broiler starter mash is formulated for the farmers who raise for the live markets and sell them at six to eight weeks. The broiler rations must generally include a growth promoter and a coccidiostat. However, these are excluded from the post-finisher broiler mash.

The broiler starter mash should not include any growth hormones or animal by-products in the formulation.

The broiler rations generally contain a higher level of protein and a lower level of fiber than the other rations. This ration is designed to allow the birds to gain more weight quickly. In addition to that, it has a lower fiber content than the other rations.

The broiler ration will help them to achieve a better overall body condition score (BCS). They will also grow faster.

The broiler ration will help them to achieve a higher feed conversion ratio (FCR) which means that they will convert their feed into more weight gain. A higher FCR means that they are able to gain weight at a faster rate. The broiler ration contains a higher protein level compared to the other rations.

See also  Poultry Feed Formulation

The broilers should be fed the starter mash from the time they are one day old to 16 days old. The approximate feed consumption for the broilers will vary between 600g to 800g per bird.

The broiler starter mash is generally in the format of mash or crumbles. It would be best to feed the chickens crumbles to ensure faster growth and more efficient feed conversion.

However, if you want to slow down the growth and minimize the water belly occurrences, you can feed the poultry mash.

The table below shows the ingredients used in broiler starter mash formulation and the ration in which these ingredients should be mixed:

ingredients and their correct proportion in formulating broilers starter
ingredients and their correct proportion in formulating broilers starter

 

How to Make Broiler Grower Mash

The broiler growers mash is in pellet form.  The broiler grower mash is fed to the chickens from the age of 17 days to 30 days. Like in the broiler starter mash, the broiler grower mash’s rations contain a growth promoter and coccidiostat but no growth hormones or animal byproducts.

The feed consumption per bird will approximately be 1.5kg.

The feed composition of the broiler grower mash is the same as that of the broiler starter mash, except for the inclusion of a feed additive called a growth promoter.

This additive stimulates the growth of the chicks and the rate at which they gain weight. It also helps the chicks to absorb nutrients, especially protein, more effectively.

 

Below is a table showing the nutrient content for a broiler grower mash formulation:-

ingredients and their correct proportion in formulating broilers grower mash
ingredients and their correct proportion in formulating broilers grower mash

 

How to Make Broiler Finisher Mash

The broiler finisher mash is fed to the chickens from 30 days to the age of 38 days. Every bird will consume approximately 1kg of broiler finisher mash from 30 days to the age of 38 days.  The broiler finisher mash is in the form of pellets.

See also  Poultry Feed Formulation: Feed Ingredients and Additives
ingredients and their correct proportion in formulating broilers finisher mash
ingredients and their correct proportion in formulating broilers finisher mash

The Broiler Post Finisher Mash

The broiler post finisher mash is fed to the broilers five days before slaughter.  This diet is richer in protein content.

 

References:

  1. Robert Blair (15 September 2008). Nutrition and Feeding of Organic Poultry. CABI. p. 238. ISBN 978-1-84593-406-4. Retrieved 7 November 2012.
  2. Malcolm F. Fuller (2004). The Encyclopedia of Farm Animal Nutrition. CABI. p. 68. ISBN 978-0-85199-369-0. Retrieved 7 November 2012.
  3. James R. Gillespie; Frank B. Flanders (2010). Modern Livestock and Poultry Production. Cengage Learning. p. 693. ISBN 978-1-4283-1808-3. Retrieved 7 November 2012.
  4. G. F. Heuser (1955). Feeding Poultry. Norton Creek Press. pp. 527–626. ISBN 978-0-9721-7702-3. Retrieved 19 August 2014.
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31 thoughts on “Scientifically Proven Ways How to Make Broiler Mash: Starter Mash, Grower Mash and Finisher Mash (Updated Nov. 2021)”

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  2. Pingback: 5 Important Things You Didn't Know on What do Baby Chickens Eat? - POULTRY FEED FORMULATION

  3. Thank you for sharing excellent informations. Your site is very cool. I’m impressed by the details that you have on this web site. It reveals how nicely you perceive this subject.

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  5. Thanks for this impressive information. Pls can you send me mail on how to produce the feeds myself.band also what to do when the birdsbe are loosing weight.

  6. Akano opeyemi

    Hello. Please, I want to ask that does the above formulas changes with wheather? If they do can you give the adjustment formulas. thanks.

  7. Poultry farming is in my blood and it has become my hoby.I have really liked your page especially the materials you are giving out.Thank you so much for this.The next topic I would wish to learn is the feed ratio/amount per stage of growth of broilers and layers

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